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Richard - 619-277-6495
Patty - 619-277-2824

Email
RichardandPatty@gmail.com

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richardburns.usana.com

Update of Our Results on the Reset Nation Challenge

Update of Our Results on the Reset Nation Challenge #weightloss #health

10 pounds of fat

Our Weight Loss Goals

Patty and I started on the 90-day Reset Nation Challenge on Sunday, January 17 with a goal to take off 40 and 35 unwanted pounds respectively.

How Much Weight We Have Lost So Far

Well, we are ahead of schedule to reach our weight loss goals. Patty and I shed 9 pounds each during the 5-day RESET and a total of 11 pounds in the first week. YAY!

After completing the initial RESET or jumpstart phase where we drank 3 meal replacement shakes, ate 2 protein bars as snacks, and ate a helping of fruit and a helping of vegetables each day as well as taking our nutritional supplements, we had lost a whopping 9 pounds. This is a little more than the average as most people lose around 5 pounds in those 5 days. During the RESET, we kept our exercise light as instructed. The only exercise I got was walking our dog 4 times a day for about a total of 4 miles.

During the RESET, we kept our exercise light as instructed. The only exercise I got was walking our dog 4 times a day for about a total of 4 miles.

I must admit I cheated a little on the one serving of vegetables per day part of the RESET. Certain foods like celery and carrots are zero or negative calorie food in that it burns as many or more calories to eat and digest the foods as you are taking in. I ate celery and carrots a couple times a day if I was feeling even an urge to eat something starchy or sugary. It really helped.

What’s Next on our Weight Loss Journey

Right now we are on to the transform phase. That is having 2 meal replacement shakes per day, 2 protein bars as snacks and one healthy, regular meal. We will continue on this for 28 days.

Once we have completed the transform phase, we will do one week of the maintain phase where you have one shake per day and two healthy, regular meals.

Then we will start another 5-day RESET or jumpstart phase, do another 28 days of the transform phase and another week of the maintain phase.

That will put us at 80 days of the 90-day challenge. Our plan is to have achieved our goals at that point and finish up with 10 days of transform phase to give us a little cushion on our goals.

Wish us luck and perseverance!

Join us on the Reset Nation Challenge.

It’s not too late to join us on the Reset Nation Challenge

It’s not too late to join us on the Reset Nation Challenge. Simply visit resetnationchallenge.com and sign up. Then contact us to get you signed up as a preferred customer with USANA so you can take advantage of the discounts available. Becoming a Preferred Customer is free and there is not a commitment to buy additional products. It is simply a way to have your products shipped directly to you and save money.

For more information on the RESET Nation Challenge Click Here

To become a Preferred Customer CLICK HERE


 

I do hope you decide to join us on our adventure. Once that momentum kicks in, there is no limit to what peaks we can climb together.

Please feel free to contact us about USANA products or the USANA business opportunity or simply to tell us your thoughts on what you have seen and read on this website. We appreciate the feedback.

#networkmarketing #entrepreneur #timefreedom #financialsecurity

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Long-term use of a daily multivitamin/mineral may lower cancer risk in middle-aged and older men

Long-term Use of a Daily Multivitamin/mineral May Lower Cancer Risk in Middle-aged and Older Men

May 13, 2015

Long-term use of a daily multivitamin/mineral may lower cancer risk in middle-aged and older men

 At a Glance

A daily multivitamin/ mineral supplement taken long-term may help reduce cancer risk in middle-aged and older men.

Read more about this research below.

A large study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, using data obtained from the Physicians’ Health Study II, has found that the use of a daily multivitamin/ mineral supplement long term can reduce the risk of cancer occurrence.

In this randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study of approximately 14,641 male physicians ages 50 or older from the United States, participants were randomly assigned to take a daily multivitamin/ mineral supplement or a placebo between 1997 and June 2011. During the median follow-up of 11.2 years, researchers recorded 2,669 cancer cases, including 1,373 prostate cancer cases and 210 colorectal cancer cases. When examining outcomes at the study’s end, the researchers found an 8 percent reduction in total cancer occurrence among participants assigned to multivitamin use.

Although the main reason to take multivitamins is to prevent nutritional deficiency, this study reinforces the value of long-term consistent use of a daily multivitamin as a convenient and affordable insurance policy for good health and possible cancer prevention in middle-aged and older adults.J. Michael Gaziano et al. Multivitamins in the Prevention of Cancer in Men: The Physicians’ Health Study II Randomized Controlled Trial.  JAMA. 2012;308(18):doi:10.1001/jama.2012.14641.

USANA The Doctors Are In Tour Coming to Albuquerque

USANA The Doctors Are In Tour Coming to Albuquerque

USANA Doctors Are In Tour 2015 - Albuquerque

The “Doctors Are In” Tour will be coming to Albuquerque on Friday, May 8th from 6:30 to 9 PM!

Our featured speaker is USANA Scientist, AUSTIN WINEGAR! Austin is profoundly knowledgeable in the science of nutrition and in the understanding of the regulations surrounding the health and wellness industry.

Our guest speakers will be rising stars Nicole Lexi Nevarez (USANA Director), and Richard Burns (USANA Builder)!

In addition, we will feature an esteemed Doctors Panel of four doctors who will share their experience with the USANA products and/or business.

This is going to be an information-packed event….from the science behind the products and the USANA Difference, to the stories of doctors and leaders who have experienced success with the products and/or business.

Contact us if you would like to attend. We will buy tickets for the 1st 5 people who ask us.


I do hope you decide to join us on our adventure. Once that momentum kicks in, there is no telling what peaks we can climb together.

Please feel free to contact us about the USANA products or the opportunity and tell us your thoughts. We appreciate the feedback.

(Sorry, USANA entrepreneurs and preferred customers, ticket offer for new customers and prospective associates only)

Low Vitamin D levels are associated with increased dementia risk

September 17, 2014

Low Vitamin D levels are associated with increased dementia risk

At a Glance

A new study of 1,658 adults has shown that insufficient serum vitamin D levels are significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. 

Read more about this research below.

Vitamin D deficiency has recently been linked to many non-skeletal conditions, including mental and cognitive health. In a new study published in the journal Neurology, researchers sought to determine whether insufficient vitamin D blood levels were associated with an elevated risk of all-cause dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

The study included 1,658 normally healthy adults who participated in the US population-based Cardiovascular Health Study. Participants were free from dementia, cardiovascular disease and stroke at the beginning of this study. Previously collected serum vitamin D samples were analyzed and dementia and Alzheimer’s status were assessed during follow-up using criteria by the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke/Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Association. 

Over an average of 5.6 years of follow-up, 171 adults developed all-cause dementia, including 102 cases of Alzheimer’s disease specifically. Compared to subjects with vitamin D blood levels at or above 50 nmol/L (20 ng/ml), participants who were severely vitamin D deficient (<25 nmol/L, or 10 ng/ml) were more than twice as likely to develop all-cause dementia. Subjects with vitamin D levels considered deficient (25 to 50 nmol/L) were 53% more likely to develop all-cause dementia than the group with sufficient levels. Compared to those with sufficient vitamin D levels, subjects that were severely deficient and deficient were 122% and 69% more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease, respectively. 

The results add support to the idea that vitamin D plays important roles in non-skeletal conditions, and confirms that vitamin D deficiency (below 50 nmol/L or 20 ng/ml) is associated with a substantially elevated risk of all-cause dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.  

Thomas J. Littlejohns et al. Vitamin D and the risk of dementia and Alzheimer disease. Neurology 2014;83:1–9.

Higher vitamin D levels increase survival rate in postoperative adults with colorectal cancer

Higher vitamin D levels increase survival rate in postoperative adults with colorectal cancer

August 06, 2014

At a Glance

A new research article published online suggests that having a higher plasma level of vitamin D is associated with a better chance of surviving colorectal cancer.

Read more about this research below.

Low vitamin D levels are known to be associated with poor health outcomes or increased risk in many diseases including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and some cancers.

In a new study published in the Journal of Oncology, researchers investigated whether the plasma level of vitamin D after a diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) has a significant impact on survival outcome.  The Scottish research team analyzed data from 1,598 adults who had undergone surgery for stage I-III colorectal cancer.  Blood samples were taken after surgery and evaluated for vitamin D and for a specific Vitamin D gene receptor.

When compared to the patients with the lowest one-third of vitamin D levels, the patients whose vitamin D levels were in the top one-third of subjects had a significantly lower (32%) risk of dying of CRC and a 30% lower risk of dying from any cause during the 5 year follow-up period.  In patients with stage II CRC, those in the top one-third of vitamin D levels experienced a 56% reduction in mortality.

The researchers found interactions between vitamin D levels and specific type of vitamin D gene receptor, indicating a causal relationship between vitamin D and survival.

This study shows that in patients with stage I-III colorectal cancer, higher post-surgery vitamin D levels are associated with a better outcome and a lower risk of mortality.  Since this was an observational study, carefully designed clinical trials are still needed to confirm whether vitamin D supplementation would provide survival benefits for patients with colorectal cancer.

Zgaga L Plasma Vitamin D Concentration Influences Survival Outcome After a Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer.  J Clin Oncol. 2014 Jul 7. pii: JCO.2013.54.5947. [Epub ahead of print]

Supplemental magnesium improves physical performance in healthy older women

Supplemental magnesium improves physical performance in healthy older women

At a GlanceA recent study has shown a benefit of supplemental magnesium for improving physical performance in healthy older women.

Read more about this research below.

Magnesium (Mg) is an essential mineral important in the structure and the function of the human body and also as a cofactor for hundreds of enzyme systems that regulate diverse biochemical reactions in the body. Unfortunately, dietary surveys in the US continue to show that older people are particularly susceptible to magnesium deficiency for various reasons, including an inadequate dietary intake, reduced absorption, and greater losses in stools and urine. A poor magnesium status has been associated with reduced physical performance, but to date no trials have established a link between magnesium supplementation and physical performance in the elderly.

In a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, investigators sought to determine whether oral magnesium supplementation could improve physical performance in healthy older women. The research group included 139 healthy women with an average age of 71.5 years that were attending a mild fitness program. The study group included 77 controls and 62 women who were given 300 mg/day of magnesium oxide for 12 weeks. The researchers were blinded to the grouping. 

The primary outcome analyzed was a change in the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). The scores for the SPPB did not differ between the two groups at baseline.  After 12 weeks of supplementation, the group taking magnesium had a significantly better total SPPB score than the controls. The treatment group also had a significantly better test score for chair stand times and 4 minute walking speeds. The improvements were even more evident in women with dietary magnesium intakes below the RDA. 

The findings of this study indicate that magnesium supplementation may play a role in delaying age-related decline in physical performance in healthy older women, especially if dietary intake is below recommended levels.
Nicola Veronese et al. Effect of oral magnesium supplementation on physical performance in healthy elderly women involved in a weekly exercise program: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr published ahead of print July 9, 2014 doi: 10.3945/ajcn.113.080168. 

Vitamins and Athletes

Vitamins and Athletes

Contributed by Mark DeCotis
The issue of the value of  vitamins and supplements for athletes can be confounding and confusing, to say the least.
John Cuomo, Ph.D., the executive director of Research and Development at USANA Health Sciences addresses the most common questions on the subject.
Vitamins and Athletes  John Cuomo, Ph.D. USANA Health Sciences
Cuomo holds a bachelor¹s degree in chemistry from the University of Vermont, a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Penn State, and he also completed a post-doctoral fellowship in bio-organic chemistry at the University of Oregon. He brings more than 25 years of expertise to his work at USANA and holds two patents for Olivol® along with over 20 other U.S. and international patents.

Which vitamins are essential for athletes and why?

A: All vitamins and minerals play specific roles in the body to maintain an athlete’s well-being, energy and metabolism. Since many vitamins and minerals work together in the body, if an athlete is low on one, it affects how the body functions as a whole. Athletes require excellent nutrition in order to meet the challenges they face. For example, intense training increases oxidative stress and weakens the immune system. Antioxidants such as betacarotene, vitamin E, vitamin C, CoQ10 and several others may be particularly important.
Vitamin D also plays a very important role in immune and muscle function. So, for athletes, I recommend a high-quality multivitamin/mineral supplement with advanced doses of these nutrients. Vitamin and mineral deficiencies do not develop overnight, so most athletes are unaware they are deficient in certain nutrients until they begin taking supplements and/or eat healthier. These changes allow them to begin to feel and perform better. This phenomenon can leave the athlete wondering how they ever got by in the deficient state they had become accustomed to.

In what dosages should athletes ingest vitamins?

A: Athletes typically need a higher intake of vitamins and minerals similar to their increased caloric needs. One assumption is that athletes consume additional calories to match their higher energy expenditure and these additional calories will contain enough vitamins to match increased needs. This is likely incorrect, as most athletes do not consume enough nutrient-dense fruits and vegetables to meet their increased calorie needs. A balanced approach of a varied diet and a daily high-quality multivitamin regimen is recommended over supplementing with individual vitamins and minerals. Blood tests and other tests can help with creating a more specific supplementation regimen for an athlete.
I believe most athletes should be getting between 10,000 and 15,000 IU vitamin A (from betacarotene), 500 to 1,500 mg vitamin C, 400 IU vitamin E, advanced doses of the B vitamins (including 20-30 mg of vitamin B1, B2, and B6), about 30 mg niacinamide, 150-200 mcg B12 and 800-1,000 mcg folic acid every day. In addition, research now suggests that daily doses of 2,000 to 5,000 IU of vitamin D are required for optimal immune, bone, and muscle health.
And don’t forget the minerals, particularly calcium (1,000-1,200 mg per day from foods and supplements), and about 400 mg or more magnesium, as well as iodine (250-300 mcg), zinc (15–20 mg), copper (1-2 mg), manganese (4-5 mg), boron (4 mg), and the trace minerals selenium (150-200 mcg), chromium (250-300 mcg), molybdenum (50 mcg) and vanadium (30-40 mcg).

Which vitamins if any have no value to athletes?

A: All vitamins and minerals potentially have value to athletes. The extent of the benefit of each depends on how much the athlete is getting from his or her diet and supplement regimen and how much the vitamins and minerals are being used by the athlete. So, for example, an athlete who trains outdoors would likely have different vitamin D needs than an athlete who trains indoors.

Where do you stand on the argument that all supplements have no value and that a balanced diet will achieve the same results?

A: There’s a difference between what we think athletes should be eating and what they are actually eating. And there’s a difference between the minimal nutrition that our bodies need to function and the optimal nutrition that our bodies require to perform at its best.
We know that most athletes, just like everyone else, do not always eat the healthiest diets. In general, very few athletes get nine servings or more per day of fruits and vegetables. Very few eat enough whole grains and most eat too much refined foods. Consuming enough nutrients at the right times is very important to athletes. An athlete would have to eat a lot of extra nutrient-dense foods to meet his or her nutritional needs and shakes, bars, and other supplements offer a convenient way to fill in those nutritional gaps.
The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) describes a nutrient intake level that meets minimal needs, but not necessarily what is optimal. Studies such as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) have demonstrated that nearly no one in the U.S., athletes included, get even the RDA of most vitamins. Imagine what that means for an athlete who is working their bodies much harder than the rest of us. Even if an athlete ate an optimal diet — which they all should try to do — it would still be very hard for them to obtain optimal levels of vitamins C, D, E, many B vitamins, or the minerals they need for health and performance. So I recommend that athletes take a high-quality supplement.

Are specific vitamins specific to specific sports, such as running, swimming, cycling, etc.?

A: Athletes involved in extreme endurance sports experience a higher level of oxidative stress and would likely benefit more from antioxidants, such as vitamin C, vitamin E, and selenium. Iron depletion and deficiency are common in female athletes and more so in those involved in weight-dependent and aesthetic sports. Vegetarian athletes also are at increased risk for poor iron status.
Athletes in weight-dependent sports may restrict their calorie intake, making it harder to get adequate vitamins and minerals from a limited amount of food. Indoor sport athletes, or those with darker skin, are at increased risk of vitamin D deficiency. Young, growing athletes, aging athletes, or athletes with a history of stress fractures may benefit from calcium and vitamin D even more than other athletes. Many athletes take glucosamine for joint health and pain, and there is convincing data to support this practice.

What is the risk posed to athletes who are not eating a balanced diet or not taking worthwhile supplements (legal vitamins)?

A: During competitive years, the athlete who is not eating and supplementing right has an increased risk of getting sick, becoming injured and not adapting to their training as quickly. Athletes place high demands on their bodies, so the hope is that in keeping up with these demands through proper eating and supplementation habits, they can maintain a high level of performance over their lifespan.
Cumulative damage to the body from years of hard training likely catches up faster to the athletes with poor nutritional habits. Benefits of a good supplementation and nutritional program for athletes will likely be evident years after their competitive days are over. Those who have received optimal nutrients, in the long term, will have much lower risks of developing chronic degenerative diseases that are endemic to aging adults.